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Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


September 13

The Polish złoty is the official currency of Poland. While originally existing only as coinage, radical changes to the currency were made during the Kościuszko Uprising in 1794. The second partition of the vast Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth resulted in the loss of approximately 200,000 square kilometres (77,000 sq mi) of land and precipitated an economic collapse. The widespread shortage of funds to finance the defense of remaining territories forced the insurrectionist government to look for alternatives. In June 1794, the Polish military leader Tadeusz Kościuszko began printing paper money as a substitute for coinage, which could not be minted in required quantities. The first Polish banknotes were issued on 8 July 1794. The banknotes depicted here, in five denominations from five to one hundred złotych, are from the first issue in 1794 and today form part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Kingdom of Poland; photographed by Andrew Shiva


September 12

Spiny-cheeked honeyeater

The spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis) is a species of bird in the family Meliphagidae, the honeyeaters, and the only species in the monotypic genus Acanthagenys. It is large for a honeyeater, ranging from 22 to 27 centimetres (8.7 to 10.6 in) in length and weighing around 52 grams (1.8 oz). A common species throughout most of Australia, the birds are sociable and aggressive, and often observed foraging in large flocks. This spiny-cheeked honeyeater was photographed near Patchewollock in the Australian state of Victoria.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


September 11

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center, seen here amongst the skyline of Lower Manhattan, is the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex in New York City. It is the tallest building in the United States, the tallest in the Western Hemisphere, and the seventh-tallest in the world. The supertall structure has the same name as the North Tower of the original World Trade Center, which was destroyed in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Photograph credit: King of Hearts


September 10

A demonstration of the effect of a multiplane camera, a motion-picture camera that was used in the traditional animation process that moves a number of pieces of artwork past the camera at various speeds and at various distances from one another. This creates a sense of parallax or depth.

Various parts of the artwork layers are left transparent to allow other layers to be seen behind them. The movements are calculated and photographed frame by frame, with the result being an illusion of depth by having several layers of artwork moving at different speeds: the further away from the camera, the slower the speed. The multiplane effect is sometimes referred to as a parallax process.

Video credit: Janke


September 9

Theloderma corticale

Theloderma corticale is a species of frog in the family Rhacophoridae. It is found in northern Vietnam and China, and possibly also in Laos. Its common name, the mossy frog, arises from the fact that its skin is a mottled green and brown that resembles moss growing on rock, forming an effective camouflage. It has large sticky pads on its toes and a soft underbelly, with a snout–vent length of 61 millimetres (2.4 in). The females grow larger than the males and can reach sizes of 8 to 9 centimetres (3.1 to 3.5 in). When frightened, it will curl into a ball and play dead. This T. corticale frog was photographed at Karlsruhe Zoo in Germany.

Photograph credit: H. Zell


September 8

Daniele Hypólito

Daniele Hypólito (born September 8, 1984) is a Brazilian gymnast who competed in the 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016 Summer Olympics. This photograph depicts Hypólito performing on the balance beam in the final of the women's artistic team all-around event at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, in which Brazil finished in eighth place.

Photograph credit: Fernando Frazão


September 7

Red-and-green macaw

The red-and-green macaw (Ara chloropterus) is a species of macaw, the largest in the genus Ara. Also known as the green-winged macaw, it is widespread in the forests and woodlands of northern and central South America. This juvenile was photographed perching on a tree near the banks of the Rio Negro in the Pantanal, in southwestern Brazil.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


September 6

Scintillant hummingbird

The scintillant hummingbird (Selasphorus scintilla) is a species of hummingbird that is endemic to Costa Rica and Panama. It inhabits brushy forest edges, coffee plantations and sometimes gardens at elevations from 900 to 2,000 metres (3,000 to 6,600 ft), and up to 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) when not breeding. It is only 6.5 to 8 centimetres (2.6 to 3.1 in) long, including the bill, making it one of the smallest birds in existence, marginally larger than the bee hummingbird. This female scintillant hummingbird was photographed feeding on an Abutilon flower in the Mount Totumas cloud forest in Panama.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


September 5

Trundholm sun chariot

The Trundholm sun chariot is a Nordic Bronze Age artifact discovered in Denmark. It is a representation of the sun chariot, consisting of a bronze statue of a horse and a large bronze disk, which are placed on a device with spoked wheels. The sculpture was discovered with no accompanying objects in 1902 in a peat bog on the moor of Trundholm, on the peninsula of Odsherred in the northwestern part of Zealand. The artifact is now in the collection of the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen.

Sculpture credit: unknown; photographed by the National Museum of Denmark


September 4

Historical coat of arms of the District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., is the capital city of the United States and the country's only federal district. It is located on the east bank of the Potomac River, which forms its southwestern and southern border with the state of Virginia, and it shares a land border with Maryland on its remaining sides. The city was named for George Washington, the first president of the United States, and the federal district is named after Columbia, a female personification of the nation. This illustration, created by Henry Mitchell for State Arms of the Union, published by Louis Prang in 1876, depicts the District of Columbia's historical coat of arms, featuring Columbia holding the Constitution of the United States and a Phrygian cap, with the motto Justitia omnibus ('Justice for all') below the shield.

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


September 3

Snowy-bellied hummingbird

The snowy-bellied hummingbird (Saucerottia edward) is a species of hummingbird found in Costa Rica, Panama, and far north-western Colombia. Formerly placed in the genus Amazilia, the species was reassigned to Saucerottia as part of the revised classification to create monophyletic genera after a study published in 2014 found that Amazilia was polyphyletic. It measures approximately 10 centimetres (3.9 in) in length, with a metallic-green head and upper chest, pure-white lower chest and belly, and metallic-copper back and rump. This snowy-bellied hummingbird, of the subspecies S. e. niveoventer, was photographed in the Mount Totumas cloud forest in Panama.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


September 2

Signing of the Japanese Instrument of Surrender in Tokyo Bay

The surrender of Japan, announced by the Japanese emperor Hirohito on August 15, 1945, brought the hostilities of World War II in Asia to a close. In this photograph, taken by a soldier of the United States Army Signal Corps, Mamoru Shigemitsu, Minister for Foreign Affairs, signs the Japanese Instrument of Surrender on behalf of the Japanese government aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, formally ending the war. U.S. Army general Richard K. Sutherland watches on the left of the photograph, and Shigemitsu is assisted by Toshikazu Kase, an official of the Japanese Foreign Ministry, on the right.

Photograph credit: Stephen E. Korpanty; restored by Adam Cuerden


September 1

A Trip to the Moon (Le Voyage dans la Lune) is a French adventure short film directed by Georges Méliès and released on 1 September 1902. Inspired by a wide variety of sources, including Jules Verne's 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon and its 1870 sequel Around the Moon, the silent film follows a group of astronomers who travel to the Moon in a cannon-propelled capsule, explore the Moon's surface, escape from an underground group of Selenites (lunar inhabitants), and return to Earth with a captive Selenite. Its ensemble cast of French theatrical performers is led by Méliès himself as the main character, Professor Barbenfouillis. The film features the overtly theatrical style for which Méliès became famous. In an iconic shot, the astronomers' capsule hits the Man in the Moon in the eye, a visual pun on the expression dans l'œil (literally 'in the eye'), the French equivalent of the English 'bullseye'.

Film credit: Georges Méliès


August 31

Coat of arms of Idaho Territory

Coat of arms of the Idaho Territory, an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from 1863 to 1890.

Idaho Territory originally covered all of the present-day states of Idaho and Montana, and almost all of the present-day state of Wyoming, omitting only a corner in the state's extreme southwest portion. It was wholly spanned east-to-west by the bustling Oregon Trail and partly by the other emigrant trails, the California Trail and Mormon Trail which since hitting stride in 1847, had been conveying settler wagon trains to the west, and incidentally, across the continental divide into the Snake River Basin, a key gateway into the Idaho and Oregon Country interiors. After several reductions, the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as Idaho.

Credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Godot13


August 30

Plate 5 of Ignace-Gaston Pardies's celestial atlas

Ignace-Gaston Pardies (1636–1673) was a French Catholic priest and scientist. His celestial atlas, entitled Globi coelestis in tabulas planas redacti descriptio, comprised six charts of the night sky and was first published in 1674. The atlas uses a gnomonic projection so that the plates make up a cube of the celestial sphere. The constellation figures are drawn from Uranometria, but were carefully reworked and adapted to a broader view of the sky. This is the fifth plate from a 1693 edition of Pardies's atlas, featuring constellations including Lyra, Cygnus, Hercules, Ophiuchus, Sagittarius and Scorpius, Aquila, Delphinus, and Corona Australis, as well as Antinous, an obsolete constellation. All of these are visible in the Northern Hemisphere, though a few cross the boundary from the northern sky into the southern sky.

Map credit: Ignace-Gaston Pardies


August 29

Henrietta Rodman

Henrietta Rodman (August 29, 1877 – March 21, 1923) was an American educator and feminist who was active in advocating on behalf of married women teachers for their right to promotion and maternity leave. She taught English and was a vocational counselor at Wadleigh High School for Girls in New York City. Opposed to the school board's restrictive policies on married women teachers, she married a psychologist friend, Herman de Fremery, in 1913, and announced it to the press, saying: "If the married state affects a woman's work, the authorities can mark her accordingly. If it does not affect her work, and if she is as good a teacher as she was before, she deserves promotion, if it comes to her." Rodman threw crowded dinner parties in her top-floor apartment; Mary Hunter Austin recalled attending one such dinner, and meeting James Weldon Johnson there. This photograph of Rodman was taken around the early 1910s.

Photograph credit: Bain News Service; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 28

Treasury Note

The Treasury Note (also known as a Coin Note) was a type of representative money issued by the United States government from 1890 until 1893 to individuals selling silver bullion to the Treasury. A distinguishing feature of the 1890 series of Treasury Notes (and one that greatly appeals to collectors) is the extremely ornate designs on the reverse of the banknotes. It was intended to make counterfeiting much more difficult, but opponents argued that the extensive detail would make it more difficult to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit notes. Consequently, the designs for the reverse were simplified on the 1891 series of Treasury Notes, of which a complete set, comprising nine denominations from $1 to $1000, is pictured here. Each bears the engraved signatures of James Fount Tillman (Register of the Treasury) and Daniel N. Morgan (Treasurer of the United States), and a portrait of a different individual, as indicated above. The banknotes are part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; scanned by Andrew Shiva


August 27

Rhacophorus kio

Rhacophorus kio is a species of frog in the family Rhacophoridae. First described from Laos, the species is also known from southern China (Yunnan and Guangxi), northern Thailand, eastern India, Vietnam, and Cambodia. It is an arboreal species that has been recorded from primary and secondary evergreen rainforests with a closed canopy, generally at low elevations. This R. kio frog was photographed in Kui Buri National Park, Thailand.

Photograph credit: Rushenb


August 26

White-fronted bee-eater

The white-fronted bee-eater (Merops bullockoides) is a species of bee-eater widely distributed in sub-equatorial Africa. Like other bee-eaters, it is a richly coloured, slender bird, but with a distinctive black mask, white forehead, square tail, and a bright red throat, with a length of 23 centimetres (9 in). This white-fronted bee-eater was photographed on the Linyanti River in Namibia.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


August 25

Overview diagram of the citric acid cycle

The citric acid cycle, also known as the TCA cycle (tricarboxylic acid cycle) or the Krebs cycle, is a series of chemical reactions to release stored energy through the oxidation of acetyl-CoA derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. In addition, the cycle provides precursors of certain amino acids, as well as NADH, a reducing agent, which are used in numerous other reactions. Its central importance to many biochemical pathways suggests that it was one of the earliest components of metabolism and may have originated abiogenically. The German-born British biochemist Hans Krebs received the 1953 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his identification of the cycle in 1937. The name of this metabolic pathway is derived from citric acid, which is consumed and then regenerated by this sequence of reactions to complete the cycle. The cycle consumes acetate (in the form of acetyl-CoA) and water, and reduces NAD+ to NADH, releasing carbon dioxide. The NADH generated by the cycle is fed into the oxidative phosphorylation (electron transport) pathway. The net result of these two closely linked pathways is the oxidation of nutrients to produce usable chemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate. These processes are depicted in this overview diagram of the citric acid cycle.

Diagram credit: YassineMrabet; edited by Narayanese and TotoBaggins; vectorized by WikiUserPedia


August 24

Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant (1978–2020) was an American professional basketball player who spent his entire twenty-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a shooting guard. Widely regarded as one of the greatest basketball players of all time, Bryant won five NBA championships and was an eighteen-time NBA All-Star, a fifteen-time member of the All-NBA Team, the 2008 NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP), and a two-time NBA Finals MVP. He was posthumously voted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2020, and August 24 of that year was commemorated as Kobe Bryant Day in recognition of his jersey numbers, 8 and 24. This photograph depicts Bryant playing for the Lakers against the Golden State Warriors in 2005.

Photograph credit: Joseph A. Lee; edited by Kaldari


August 23

The Goldfinch

The Goldfinch is an oil-on-panel painting by the Dutch Golden Age artist Carel Fabritius of a life-sized chained goldfinch. Signed and dated 1654, it is now in the collection of the Mauritshuis in The Hague, Netherlands. The work is a trompe-l'œil painting that was once part of a larger structure, perhaps a window jamb or a protective cover. It is possible that the work was in Fabritius's studio in Delft at the time of a large gunpowder explosion on 12 October 1654 that killed him and destroyed much of the city. A common and colourful bird with a pleasant song, the goldfinch was a popular pet, and could be taught simple tricks including lifting a thimble-sized bucket of water. It was reputedly a bringer of good health, and was used in Italian Renaissance painting as a symbol of Christian redemption and the Passion of Jesus. The Goldfinch is unusual for the Dutch Golden Age painting period in the simplicity of its composition and use of illusionary techniques. Following the death of its creator, it was lost for more than two centuries before its rediscovery in Brussels.

Painting credit: Carel Fabritius


August 22

Organ of Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Wells, Somerset. Construction commenced around 1175 on the site of a late-Roman mausoleum and an 8th-century abbey church. The cathedral has been described by the historian John Harvey as Europe's first truly Gothic structure, lacking the Romanesque work that survives in many other cathedrals. It is the seat of the bishop of Bath and Wells. This photograph depicts Wells Cathedral's organ, built from 1909 to 1910 by Harrison & Harrison of Durham with parts retained from the old organ that dated to the 17th century.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


August 21

Obverse and reverse of an 1836 Argentine eight-escudo coin

The Argentine real was the currency of Argentina between 1813 and 1881. From 1822, it was subdivided into ten décimos. The sol was also issued during this period and was equal to the real, while the peso was worth eight reales and the escudo was worth sixteen reales. This 1836 eight-escudo gold coin was issued by the Argentine Confederation, a predecessor state of modern Argentina, featuring a portrait of the Argentine politician and general Juan Manuel de Rosas on the obverse, and a depiction of a mountain with crossed flags and cannons on the reverse. Only six of these coins are known to exist; this one forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Coin design credit: Argentine Confederation, photographed by the National Numismatic Collection


August 20

Jaguar

The jaguar (Panthera onca) is a large species of cat and the only living member of the genus Panthera native to the Americas. With a body length of up to 1.85 metres (6 ft 1 in) and a weight of up to 96 kilograms (212 lb), it is the largest cat species in the Americas and the third-largest in the world. The distinctively marked coat features pale yellow to tan fur covered by spots that transition to rosettes on the sides, although a melanistic black coat appears in some individuals. Its powerful bite allows it to pierce the carapaces of turtles and tortoises, and to employ an unusual killing method: it bites directly through the skull of mammalian prey between the ears to deliver a fatal blow to the brain. This male South American jaguar was photographed in the Encontro das Águas State Park, in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


August 19

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem by the English writer Lewis Carroll, telling the story of ten characters who cross the ocean to hunt a mysterious creature known as the Snark. The poem was published in 1876 with illustrations by Henry Holiday. This is the tenth plate from his illustrations, accompanying "Fit the Eighth: The Vanishing", in which things end badly for the Baker, one of the hunters:

In the midst of the word he was trying to say
In the midst of his laughter and glee,
He had softly and suddenly vanished away—
For the Snark was a Boojum, you see.

Illustration credit: Henry Holiday; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 18

Glyphoglossus molossus

Glyphoglossus molossus is a species of frog in the family Microhylidae. Its common names include the blunt-headed burrowing frog and the balloon frog. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, moist savanna, intermittent freshwater marshes, rural gardens, temporary ponds, and heavily degraded former forest in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. This G. molossus frog was photographed in the district of Mueang Loei in northern Thailand.

Photograph credit: Rushen


August 17

Omega Nebula

The Omega Nebula is an H II region, a type of emission nebula, in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Jean-Philippe Loys de Cheseaux in 1745. Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764 as number 17 in his set of comet-like astronomical objects. The nebula is by some of the richest starfields of the Milky Way, in the northern two-thirds of Sagittarius. This astrophotograph of the Omega Nebula was taken by the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), located at the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in Chile. Captured by OmegaCAM, the VST's wide-field camera, in 2011, the photograph was the telescope's first image to be released.

Photograph credit: ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM


August 16

Double-barred finch

The double-barred finch (Stizoptera bichenovii) is a species of estrildid finch found in dry savanna, tropical (lowland) dry grassland, and shrubland habitats in northern and eastern Australia. It is sometimes referred to as Bicheno's finch or the owl finch, the latter owing to the dark ring of feathers around the face. This double-barred finch perching on a branch was photographed in Glen Davis, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 15

Bengal tiger

The Bengal tiger is a population of the tiger subspecies Panthera tigris tigris found in the Indian subcontinent. Ranking among the largest wild cats alive today, it is considered to be one of the world's charismatic megafauna. The tiger is estimated to have been present in the Indian subcontinent since the Late Pleistocene, for about 12,000 to 16,500 years. Today it is threatened by poaching, and habitat loss and fragmentation, and was estimated to comprise fewer than 2,500 wild individuals by 2011. The tiger is the national animal of India. This female Bengal tiger was photographed in Kanha Tiger Reserve, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December