Bemidji State Beavers women's ice hockey

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Bemidji State Beavers women's ice hockey
Current season
UniversityBemidji State
ConferenceWCHA
Head coachJim Scanlan
7th season, 100–106–15
ArenaSanford Center
Capacity: 4,700
LocationBemidji, Minnesota
ColorsGreen and white[1]
   

The Bemidji State Beavers are a women's college hockey team representing Bemidji State University in Bemidji, Minnesota, United States. They play at the NCAA Division I level, and compete in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association(WCHA).

History[edit]

The Bemidji State University intercollegiate women's ice hockey program began competition in the 1998–1999 season. The first head coach was Ruthann Cantile. She was head coach from the program's founding to the start of WCHA play, and the beginning of national NCAA Championships in 2001.

Over the next several years, Bemidji State met with little success, while playing against the best teams in the nation, in conference play. The Beavers were able to recruit 2002 German Olympian Defender Nina Zieganhals[2] in 2003. After disappointing seasons under Jason Lesterberg (2000–01) and Bruce Olson, who left the program during the 2005–06 season,[3] Bemidji State hired Steve Sertich for the 2006–07 season. Sertich presided over the team for eight years until his retirement in 2014.[4]

On February 27, 2010, Bemidji State ended its 14-game playoff losing streak in a 2–1 victory over St. Cloud State.[5] The next day, the Beavers defeated St. Cloud State in Game 3, and advanced to the WCHA Final Face-Off for the first time in school history. Zuzana Tomcikova had 27 saves and the win was the Beavers 12th win of the season. It tied the school record for most wins in a season (accomplished in 2001–02).[6] The Beavers advanced to play the Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs in the WCHA semi-finals but were eliminated.

On October 16, 2010, Beaver goaltender Alana McElhinney made a career-high 56 saves. In the game, Bemidji State had its first-ever win over a No. 1-ranked team as they defeated the Mercyhurst Lakers by a 5–3 mark.[7] In addition, this was the second women's game ever played at the new Bemidji Regional Event Center.

October 29–30, 2010: Erin Cody had the biggest weekend of her collegiate career. She was involved in all seven of the Bemidji State's goals, as the Beavers swept St. Cloud State. Cody had five goals and two assists, and was a factor in both game-winning goals. Cody earned the First Star of the Game honors in both games. In the first game, Cody scored a natural hat trick (a power-play, shorthanded, and even-strength goal). All three goals were scored in the first period and set a Beavers record for most goals scored by a single player in one period. In the second game, Cody had two goals and two assists.[8]

On January 28, 2012, the Badgers hosted a record crowd of 12,402 at the Kohl Center as Wisconsin swept the Bemidji State Beavers. Alex Rigby made 28 saves to obtain her sixth shutout of the campaign. Her rival between the pipes, Bemidji State goaltender Zuzana Tomcikova made 32 saves.[9]

The Beavers made history on March 7, 2015, as they defeated the Minnesota Golden Gophers by a 1–0 tally in the semifinals of the WCHA Final Face-Off. The game-winning goal was scored by Stephanie Anderson in the third period.[10] Beavers goaltender Brittni Mowat made 37 saves, registering her seventh shutout of the season, a new program record. In addition, it marked the first time that the Beavers advanced to the championship game of the WCHA Final Face-Off.

On February 29, 2020, the Bemidji State Beavers beat the Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs in the fourth overtime period of their WCHA Quarterfinal match, making it in the longest game in WCHA women's ice hockey history, and the second longest in NCAA history. Beaver forward Reece Hunt scored the game-winning goal at 8:43 of the fourth overtime. The game lasted four hours and 50 minutes, with 128:43 of on-ice time. The final score was 2–1.[11] The victory marked Jim Scanlon's 100th win as head coach for Bemidji; he is the first coach in the women's ice hockey program's history to reach 100 wins.[12]

Year by year[edit]

Won Championship Lost Championship Conference Champions League Leader
Year Coach W L T Conference Conf.
W
Conf.
L
Conf.
T
Finish Conference Tournament NCAA Tournament
2021-22 Jim Scanlan 11 20 3 WCHA 8 18 2 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Wisconsin (1-2, 0-5) Did not qualify
2020-21 Jim Scanlan 2 16 2 WCHA 2 16 2 7th WCHA Did not qualify Did not qualify
2019–20 Jim Scanlan 16 18 3 WCHA 9 13 2 5th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (1-2, 2-1, 1-4) Did not qualify
2018–19 Jim Scanlan 13 21 2 WCHA 10 12 2 5th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (2-3, 3-4) Did not qualify
2017–18 Jim Scanlan 16 19 3 WCHA 9 13 2 5th WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (2-1, 1-4, 3-0)
Lost Semifinals vs. Wisconsin (1-4)
Did not qualify
2016–17 Jim Scanlan 12 20 3 WCHA 7 18 3 7th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota (1–3, 2–1, 2-3 ) Did not qualify
2015–16 Jim Scanlan 22 11 3 WCHA 19 9 2 3rd WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (1–5, 1–2 OT) Did not qualify
2014–15 Jim Scanlan 21 17 1 WCHA 13 14 1 5th WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (3–2, 0–2, 2–1 OT)
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota (1–0)
Lost Championship vs. Wisconsin (0–4)
Did not qualify
2013–14 Steve Sertich 11 21 4 WCHA 8 17 3 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals to North Dakota (1–4, 2–3 OT) Did not qualify
2012–13 Steve Sertich 6 26 2 WCHA 5 22 1 8th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals to Minnesota (0–5, 0–8) Did not qualify
2011–12 Steve Sertich 17 17 3 WCHA 11 15 2 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. North Dakota (1–3, 0–2) Did not qualify
2010–11 Steve Sertich 14 17 4 WCHA 11 13 4 5th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. North Dakota (2–3, 3–0, 2–3 OT) Did not qualify
2009–10 Steve Sertich 12 19 7 WCHA 9 12 7 6th WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (0–3, 2–1, 4–1)
Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (2–7)
Did not qualify
2008–09 Steve Sertich 6 25 5 WCHA 3 22 3 8th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota (1–4, 1–5) Did not qualify
2007–08 Steve Sertich 4 29 3 WCHA 1 25 2 8th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (0–6, 1–5) Did not qualify
2006–07 Steve Sertich 11 20 5 WCHA 9 15 4 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota (1–5, 1–4) Did not qualify
2005–06 Bruce Olson;
Interim: Jim Ingman, Sis Paulsen
11 23 2 WCHA 10 18 0 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (2–7, 0–3) Did not qualify
2004–05 Bruce Olson 9 24 2 WCHA 5 22 1 8th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota (3–6) Did not qualify
2003–04 Bruce Olson 5 27 2 WCHA 3 20 1 7th WCHA Did not qualify Did not qualify
2002–03 Bruce Olson 9 17 7 WCHA 5 13 6 5th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Ohio State (3–4 OT) Did not qualify
2001–02 Jason Lesteberg 12 13 8 WCHA 7 11 6 5th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Ohio State (3–5) Did not qualify
2000–01 Ruthann Cantile 9 24 1 WCHA 6 17 1 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Wisconsin (2–5) Did not qualify
1999-00 Ruthann Cantile 15 18 2 WCHA 5 17 2 6th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Wisconsin (2–9) Did not qualify
1998–99 Ruthann Cantile 2 20 0 WCHA

[13][14][15]

Current roster[edit]

As of August 21, 2022.[16]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height DoB Hometown Previous team
1 Alaska Hannah Hogenson Junior G 5' 4" (1.63 m) 2001-08-03 Anchorage, Alaska Team Alaska
2 Minnesota Makenna Deering Sophomore D 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2003-01-08 South St. Paul, Minnesota South St. Paul Secondary
4 Minnesota Taylor Larson Sophomore D 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2003-08-09 Brainerd, Minnesota Brainerd High School
5 Minnesota Abby DeLaRosa Senior D 5' 4" (1.63 m) 2001-01-11 Hugo, Minnesota White Bear Lake Area High School
7 Minnesota Shelby Breiland Sophomore F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2002-08-19 Red Lake Falls, Minnesota Thief River Falls Prowlers
8 Minnesota Taylor Nelson Junior F 5' 4" (1.63 m) 2001-08-09 Carlton, Minnesota Carlton High School
10 Alaska Raeley Carney Freshman F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2004-02-12 Wasilla, Alaska Wasilla High School
11 Minnesota Genevieve Hendrickson Sophomore F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2002-11-24 Warroad, Minnesota Franklin Pierce University
12 Minnesota Kayla Santl Junior F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2002-03-24 Roseau, Minnesota Roseau High School
13 Minnesota Paige Anderson (A) Senior F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2001-03-21 Andover, Minnesota Andover High School
14 Minnesota Anika Stoskopf Junior F 5' 5" (1.65 m) 2002-03-08 Roseau, Minnesota Roseau High School
15 Minnesota Claire Vekich Sophomore F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 2002-11-26 Coleraine, Minnesota Greenway High School
16 Minnesota Alyssa Watkins Sophomore F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2003-08-13 Duluth, Minnesota Hermantown High School
17 North Dakota Calli Forsberg Junior F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2002-01-24 Devils Lake, North Dakota Shattuck-Saint Mary's
19 Minnesota Khloe Lund Junior D 5' 3" (1.6 m) 2001-07-11 Thief River Falls, Minnesota Thief River Falls Prowlers
20 Minnesota Gabbie Smith Junior F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2001-09-06 Brainerd, Minnesota Brainerd High School
21 Wisconsin McKayla Zilisch Freshman F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2004-04-26 Appleton, Wisconsin Fox Cities Stars
22 Minnesota Kate Boland (C) Senior D 5' 5" (1.65 m) 2001-02-26 Northfield, Minnesota Northfield High School
23 Ontario Mya Headrick Freshman F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2004-11-29 Garden River, Ontario Etobicoke Jr. Dolphins
24 British Columbia Adriana Van De Leest Sophomore D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 2003-09-29 Kelowna, British Columbia Okanagan Hockey Academy
26 Ontario Kendra Fortin Sophomore D 5' 5" (1.65 m) 2003-01-31 Thunder Bay, Ontario Etobicoke Jr. Dolphins
27 Minnesota Ella Anick Sophomore D 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2002-11-03 Hermantown, Minnesota Hermantown High School
29 British Columbia Reece Hunt (A) Senior F 5' 5" (1.65 m) 2001-03-19 Nelson, British Columbia Okanagan Hockey Academy
33 Ontario Madison Faucher Freshman G 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2004-12-01 Amherstburg, Ontario Southwest Wildcats
35 Minnesota Abbie Thompson Sophomore G 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2003-08-12 Forest Lake, Minnesota Mounds View High School


Olympians[edit]

World Championships[edit]

Beavers in professional hockey[edit]

= CWHL All-Star = NWHL All-Star = Clarkson Cup Champion = Isobel Cup Champion