Big Ten Academic Alliance

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Big Ten Academic Alliance
Formation1958
TypeConsortium
HeadquartersChampaign, Illinois, US
Location
Membership
14
Chair
Nick Jones, Executive Vice President and Provost, Penn State
Websitebtaa.org

The Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA), formerly the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), is the academic consortium of the universities in the Big Ten Conference.[1] The consortium was renamed on June 29, 2016.[2]

Member universities[edit]

Locations of BTAA member institutions as of June 29, 2016.

The Big Ten Academic Alliance is an academic consortium of the 14 institutions that are members of the Big Ten Conference.[3][4][5] The University of Chicago, a former Big Ten Conference member, was a member of the CIC from 1958 to June 29, 2016.[6][7]

Current members:[8]

History[edit]

The Committee on Institutional Cooperation was established by the presidents of the Big Ten members in 1958 as the conference's academic counterpart. An invitation extended to the University of Chicago, one of the founding members of the Big Ten who withdrew from the conference in 1946, was accepted.[9]

Following its admittance to the Big Ten in 1990, the CIC invited Pennsylvania State University to join the consortium.[10] The University of Nebraska–Lincoln also joined the consortium in 2011 following the school's admittance to the Big Ten.[11]

The University of Maryland and Rutgers University, who joined the Big Ten in 2014, joined the consortium on July 1, 2013.[12]

On June 29, 2016, the name of the consortium was changed from "Committee on Institutional Cooperation" to "Big Ten Academic Alliance".[2] The University of Chicago, a former Big Ten Conference member and former member of the CIC, is not a member of the rebranded consortium, but continues to participate in programs through an affiliation agreement.[13][14]

Statistics[edit]

When considered collectively, BTAA universities educate over 605,000 students, including approximately 400,000 full-time undergraduate students and over 100,000 full-time graduate students.[15] BTAA universities award 29% of all agriculture Ph.D.s, 18% of engineering Ph.D.s, and 18% of humanities Ph.D.s in the United States annually.[16]

BTAA members, when viewed collectively, conducted a combined total of $9.8 billion in funded research and BTAA libraries own over 110 million volumes.[15]

Collectively, BTAA members employ approximately 49,000 instructional staff.[15]

Collaboration[edit]

The BTAA's collaborative efforts span the academic enterprise of its members, including:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Academic Alliance Home Page". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  2. ^ a b "The Committee on Institutional Cooperation Is Now the Big Ten Academic Alliance". Big Ten Academic Alliance. June 29, 2016. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  3. ^ "Sharing Access to Courses". Cic.net. Archived from the original on April 29, 2012. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  4. ^ "Reciprocal Library Borrowing – Introduction". Cic.net. Archived from the original on June 2, 2012. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  5. ^ "Purchasing and Licensing". Cic.net. Archived from the original on June 2, 2012. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  6. ^ "Name Change – FAQ". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  7. ^ "Big Ten's Academic Division Changes Name". Inside Higher Ed. June 30, 2016. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  8. ^ "Member Universities". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  9. ^ Wells, Herman B. (1967). A Case Study on Interinstitutional Cooperation. Educational Record
  10. ^ The Daily Collegian, July 16, 1990. [1][permanent dead link] "Board of Trustees Briefs." State College, Pa.
  11. ^ "NU jumps at Big 10 research invite". Omaha World-Herald. June 17, 2010. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010. Retrieved June 17, 2010.
  12. ^ "The CIC Welcomes Maryland and Rutgers to Membership". The Big Ten Conference. December 5, 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-12-08. Retrieved December 5, 2012.
  13. ^ "Name Change – FAQ". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Archived from the original on 2016-10-05. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  14. ^ "Big Ten's Academic Division Changes Name". Inside Higher Ed. June 30, 2016. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  15. ^ a b c "2015 Big Ten Academic Alliance University Data At-A-Glance" (PDF). Big Ten Academic Alliance. 20 April 2017. Retrieved 31 August 2017.
  16. ^ "2014–2015 Annual Report" (PDF). Committee On Institutional Cooperation. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  17. ^ "Purchasing and Licensing". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  18. ^ "Sharing Access to Courses". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  19. ^ "Leadership Development". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  20. ^ "Library Initiatives". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  21. ^ "Technology Collaborations". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  22. ^ "Global Collaborations". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  23. ^ "Faculty Communities of Interest". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.
  24. ^ "Google Book Search Project – Menu". Big Ten Academic Alliance. Retrieved 30 June 2016.

External links[edit]