St. Cloud State University

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St. Cloud State University
St. Cloud State University seal.svg
TypePublic university
Established1869
Parent institution
Minnesota State system
Endowment$30.3 million (2019)[1]
Budget$223 million (2019)[2]
PresidentRobbyn Wacker[3]
Academic staff
783
Administrative staff
773
Students16,326[4]
Undergraduates14,499
Postgraduates1,827
Location, ,
United States

45°33′0″N 94°9′0″W / 45.55000°N 94.15000°W / 45.55000; -94.15000Coordinates: 45°33′0″N 94°9′0″W / 45.55000°N 94.15000°W / 45.55000; -94.15000
CampusUrban
100 acres (40 ha) campus
ColorsSpirit red, Black and White[5]
     
NicknameHuskies
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IINSIC
NCAA Division I - NCHC
NCAA Division I - WCHA
MascotBlizzard T. Husky
Websitewww.stcloudstate.edu[6]
St. Cloud State University logo.svg

St. Cloud State University (SCSU) is a public university in St. Cloud, Minnesota. Founded in 1869, the university is one of the largest institutions in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system.[7] Its enrollment in 2020 was approximately 16,000 students[4] and it has over 120,000 alumni.[8]

History[edit]

St. Cloud State opened in 1869 as Third State Normal School. The school was one building, the Stearns House, a renovated hotel purchased by the state Legislature for $3,000. The five-member faculty was headed by Principal Ira Moore. Of the 53 original students, 43 were women. As the number of female students increased, Stearns House was completely transformed into a women's dormitory in 1874; male students organized a boarding club where they located a house near campus, overseen by a matron.[9]

In 1898, the school offered a junior college curriculum. In 1914, the school dropped its secondary education program. The Legislature authorized a name change in 1921 to St. Cloud State Teachers College. In 1957, the word "Teachers" was deleted. The first bachelor's degrees were awarded in 1925. Master's degree programs were first offered in 1953.[citation needed]

In 1975, St. Cloud State became a university, comprising five colleges and a graduate school.[10] In 1987, men's hockey became an NCAA Division I program. Two years later the team moved into a new two-rink arena called the National Hockey Center.[11]

Applied doctoral degrees were first offered in 2007.[12]

Previous school names[edit]

  • St. Cloud Normal School 1869–1921
  • St. Cloud State Teachers College 1921–1957
  • St. Cloud State College 1957–1975
  • St. Cloud State University 1975–present

Presidents[edit]

  • 1869–1875 Ira Moore
  • 1875–1881 David L. Kiehle
  • 1881–1884 Jerome Allen
  • 1884–1890 Thomas J. Gray
  • 1890–1895 Joseph Carhart
  • 1895–1902 George R. Kleeberger
  • 1902–1915 Waite A. Shoemaker
  • 1915–1916 Isabel Lawrence, interim
  • 1916–1927 Joseph C. Brown
  • 1927–1943 George A. Selke
  • 1943–1947 Dudley S. Brainard
  • 1947–1952 John W. Headley
  • 1952–1965 George F. Budd
  • 1965–1971 Robert H. Wick
  • 1971–1981 Charles J. Graham
  • 1981–1982 Lowell R. Gillette, interim
  • 1982–1992 Brendan J. MacDonald
  • 1992–1995 Robert O. Bess, interim
  • 1995–1999 Bruce F. Grube
  • 1999–2000 Suzanne R. Williams, interim
  • 2000–2007 Roy H. Saigo
  • 2007–2016 Earl H. Potter III
  • 2016–2018 Ashish Vaidya, interim
  • 2018-Present Robbyn Wacker

Academics[edit]

Academic rankings
Regional
U.S. News & World Report[13]86
National
Forbes[14]583

The university offers more than 200 majors, minors and pre-professional programs in six colleges and schools.[15]

SCSU is the only Minnesota university that offers an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredited manufacturing engineering program. It also offers ABET-accredited electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science programs.[16] The Master of engineering management is the only Minnesota program certified by the American Society of Engineering Management.[17]

The School of Graduate Studies offers more than 60 graduate programs and certificates, including specialist, Master of Arts, Master of Business Administration, Master of Engineering Management, Master of Music and Master of Science. Ed.D. doctoral degrees are offered in Higher Education Administration and Educational Administration and Leadership.[18]

Colleges and schools[edit]

St. Cloud State offers more than 200 undergraduate, more than 60 graduate programs and three doctoral programs of study in eight colleges and schools.

The Miller Center delivers library and information technology services.
  • College of Science and Engineering[19]
  • College of Liberal Arts[20]
  • School of Education,[21] NCATE accredited.
  • School of Health and Human Services[22]
  • Herberger Business School,[23] AACSB accredited.
  • School of Computing, Engineering and Environment[24]
  • School of the Public Affairs[25]
  • School of Arts[26]

Student organizations[edit]

Student body composition as of May 2, 2022
Race and ethnicity[27] Total
White 64% 64
 
Black 10% 10
 
Foreign national 10% 10
 
Asian 7% 7
 
Hispanic 5% 5
 
Other[a] 4% 4
 
Economic diversity
Low-income[b] 38% 38
 
Affluent[c] 62% 62
 

At the start of each academic year students are invited to "Mainstreet," a showcase for student organizations, campus services and community connections.[28] Students are encouraged to participate in its more than 250 student organizations, including the Investment Club, which runs a student-managed investment portfolio.[29]

Students can join one of nine Greek houses.[30]

Sororities Fraternities

Student media[edit]

KVSC 88.1 FM is an educational public radio station licensed to SCSU. The station started on May 10, 1967, and expanded broadcasting times in September 1994.[31] Among other things, KVSC is renowned for its 50-hour trivia contest,[32] which dates back to 1980, and community events, such as Granite City Radio Theatre.[33]

UTVS is the school's broadcast television station, airing student-produced content on Charter Channel 180 24/7. The station has a variety of shows, including "Husky Mag", "Crunch Time", "Husky Tonight", "Monday Night Live", "The Culture", "UTVS News En Espanol", "Faking News", and its flagship broadcast "UTVS News". Husky Productions, responsible for broadcasting hockey games at the HBNHC, also sometimes airs on UTVS.

Student governance[edit]

Student Government plays an advisory role in campus governance and a management role in distributing student-fee dollars to student organizations and campus units. Notably, it allocates funding for athletics, technology and Student Legal Services for students. The Student Government president meets regularly with the university president.

Ballots allow students to vote on leadership positions, senator positions and advisory resolutions. The president and vice president are Surkhel Yousafzai and Betty Asefaw.[34]

Students pay a $0.61 per credit fee to fund Students United, a student-led, nonprofit advocacy organization for Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System students.

Athletics[edit]

SCSU has 19 NCAA Division II teams and is a member of the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. The team name is the Huskies, represented by Blizzard, the mascot.[35] In 2014, the university updated its secondary logo, which features a Husky dog face.[36] In December 2019 SCSU announced it was discontinuing the men's football team and men's and women's golf. To remain in compliance with Title IX, the university is adding a men's soccer team.[citation needed]

Ice hockey[edit]

Men's and women's ice hockey teams compete in NCAA Division I. Men's Hockey is in the NCHC, and Women's Hockey is in the WCHA.

Herb Brooks National Hockey Center at One Herb Brooks Plaza.

In the 1986–87 season, Herb Brooks, the 1980 USA men's Olympic hockey coach, became the coach of the Huskies and helped men's hockey attain NCAA Division I status. That season he led the Huskies to a 25–10–1 record and a third-place trophy at the NCAA Division III Men's Ice Hockey Championship.[37] He also guided efforts to build the two-rink arena, Herb Brooks National Hockey Center, that now bears his name.[38] In 2001, the men's team won the WCHA post-season tournament, symbolized by the Broadmoor Trophy.[39]

In 1998, the university added a women's hockey team at the NCAA Division I level.[40]

Men's Huskies Hockey has earned 19 NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championship appearances. The team advanced to the 2013 Frozen Four.[41] The 2012–13 team's co-captain Drew LeBlanc was named WCHA Player of the Year and earned numerous national honors, including the Hobey Baker Award, the most prestigious award in men's college hockey.[42] The 2013 team also earned a share of the WCHA league title and the MacNaughton Cup.[43] The 2014 team earned the Penrose Cup, league title trophy for the inaugural season of the NCHC.[44] In 2016 the team won the NCHC post-season tournament, the Frozen Faceoff.[45] In 2018, the team won the NCHC regular-season title, the Penrose Cup, with a 16-4-4 record.[46]

Wrestling[edit]

Huskies Wrestling won the NCAA Wrestling Championship in 2020,[47] 2019,[48] 2018,[49] 2016[50] and 2015[51] and placed second in 2017, 2013, 2012, and 2011.

Basketball[edit]

From 1982-90, Women's Huskies Basketball dominated the North Central Conference, compiling a 179-58 record in that timespan and advancing three times to the NCAA Women's Division II Basketball Tournament quarterfinals.[52] SCSU won the NSIC Championship in 2020, winning the title for the second time in program history and the first time since 2009.[53]

Men's Huskies basketball, created in 1901, made 10 NCAA Men's Division II Basketball Tournament appearances. The Huskies advanced to a 2010 semifinal, losing 76–70 to Indiana University of Pennsylvania. They finished 29–6 that season.[54][55]

Notable alumni[edit]

Athletes[edit]

Notable faculty and staff[edit]

  • Mildred L. Batchelder – namesake of the ALA award given to the publisher of a translated children's book.[78]
  • Herb Brooks – former St. Cloud State and U.S. Olympic men's hockey coach.
  • Bruce Hyde – cast member of the original Star Trek TV series.
  • Jim Pehler – Former member of the Minnesota House of Representatives for 18 years.[79]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Other consists of Multiracial Americans & those who prefer to not say.
  2. ^ The percentage of students who received an income-based federal Pell grant intended for low-income students.
  3. ^ The percentage of students who are a part of the American middle class at the bare minimum.

References[edit]

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  4. ^ a b Hertel, Nora (October 22, 2019). "How has enrollment at Minnesota State schools changed in a decade?". St. Cloud Times. Retrieved 5 December 2019.
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External links[edit]