Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey
Current season
Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey athletic logo
UniversityUniversity of Wisconsin–Madison
ConferenceWCHA
Head coachMark Johnson
18th season, 525–91–44
ArenaLaBahn Arena
Capacity: 2,273
LocationMadison, Wisconsin
ColorsCardinal and white[1]
   
Fight songOn, Wisconsin!
NCAA Tournament championships
2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2019, 2021
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
2008, 2012, 2017
NCAA Tournament Frozen Four
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
NCAA Tournament appearances
2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022
Conference Tournament championships
2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021
Conference regular season championships
2006, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2020, 2021

The Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey team is the hockey team that represents the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin.

History[edit]

On October 8, 1999, the Bulldogs played the Wisconsin Badgers in the first ever Women's WCHA conference game at the Kohl Center in Madison, WI. It was the highest attended game of the season (3,892) and resulted in an 8–1 defeat of the Badgers.[2]

In 2006, the Wisconsin Badgers became the first team outside the state of Minnesota to win the Women's Frozen Four championship. The Badgers defeated the defending champions, the Minnesota Golden Gophers, by a score of 3–0 at Mariucci Arena in Minneapolis, Minnesota.[3]

On January 28, 2012, the Wisconsin Badgers broke the NCAA women's hockey attendance record for the third consecutive year[4] with 12,402 fans in attendance.[5] The game was part of a two-game sweep of the Bemidji State Beavers. The previous record for most fans to watch a women's college hockey game at the Kohl Center was 10,668. That record was set on January 29, 2011.[6]

On November 6, 2016, Ann-Renee Desbiens achieved career shutout number 44, breaking Noora Raty’s record for most NCAA career shutouts.[7]

An 8-2 win on December 4, 2016 against their rivals, the Minnesota Golden Gophers resulted in a career milestone. Playing in front of a sellout crowd at Labahn Arena, Sarah Nurse scored a hat trick, becoming the first player in program history to score a hat trick against Minnesota.[8] It marked the first time that Wisconsin scored eight goals in a game since October 11, 2015 against Ohio State, as five different Badgers scored at least one goal.

On January 14, 2017 Wisconsin once again broke its own NCAA women's hockey single-game attendance record of 13,573 which was set in 2014. The Badgers defeated St. Cloud State 2-0 at their at Fill the Bowl event in front of a crowd of 15,359.[9]

Appearing in the 2021 NCAA National Collegiate Women's Ice Hockey Tournament versus the Northeastern Huskies, Daryl Watts scored the game-winning goal in a 2-1 overtime win.[10] With the win, the program captured its sixth national championship, all with Mark Johnson as head coach.

Season by season results[edit]

Won Championship Lost Championship Conference Champions League Leader
Year Coach W L T Conference Conf.
W
Conf.
L
Conf.
T
Finish Conference Tournament NCAA Tournament
2021–22 Mark Johnson 26 8 4 WCHA 18 6 3 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Bemidji State (2-1, 5-0)
Lost Semifinals vs. Ohio State (1-2)
Won First Round vs. Clarkson (3-1)
Lost Quarterfinals vs. Northeastern (2-4)
2020–21 Mark Johnson 17 3 1 WCHA 12 3 1 1st WCHA First Round Bye
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota (5–3)
Won Championship vs. Ohio State (3–2 OT)
Won First Round vs. Providence (3–0)
Won Frozen Four vs. Ohio State (4–2)
Won Championship vs. Northeastern (2–1 OT)
2019–20 Mark Johnson 28 4 3 WCHA 17 4 3 1st WCHA First Round Bye
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (4–1)
Lost Championship to Ohio State (1–0 OT)
2020 TOURNAMENT CANCELED
DUE TO COVID-19 pandemic
2018–19 Mark Johnson 35 4 2 WCHA 18 4 2 2nd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (5–0, 8–0)
Won Semifinals vs. Ohio State (3–2)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (3–1)
Won First Round vs. Syracuse (4–0)
Won Frozen Four vs. Clarkson (5–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (2–0)
2017–18 Mark Johnson 31 5 2 WCHA 20 2 2 1st WCHA First Round Bye
Won Semifinals vs. Bemidji State (4–1)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota (1–3)
Won First Round vs. Minnesota (4–0)
Lost Frozen Four vs. Colgate (3–4 2OT)
2016–17 Mark Johnson 33 3 4 WCHA 22 2 4 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota State (7–0, 6–0)
Won Semifinals vs. North Dakota (2–1)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota-Duluth (4–1)
Won First Round vs. Robert Morris(7–0)
Won Frozen Four vs. Boston College (1–0)
Lost Championship vs. Clarkson (0–3)
2015–16 Mark Johnson 35 4 1 WCHA 24 3 1 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota State (4–0, 6–0)
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (5–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota(1–0)
Won First Round vs. Mercyhurst (6–0)
Lost Frozen Four vs. Minnesota 2–3(OT)
2014–15 Mark Johnson 29 7 4 WCHA 19 6 3 2nd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (5–1, 4–1)
Won Semifinals vs. North Dakota (4–1)
Won Championship vs. Bemidji State (4–0)
Won First Round vs. Boston University (5–1)
Lost Frozen Four vs. Minnesota (1–3)
2013–14 Mark Johnson 28 8 2 WCHA 21 5 2 2nd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota State (4–0. 0–3, 2–0)
Lost Semifinals vs. North Dakota (0–1)
Won First Round vs. Harvard (2–1)
Lost Frozen Four vs. Minnesota (3–5)
2012–13 Mark Johnson 23 10 2 WCHA 17 9 2 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (5–0, 4–1)
Lost Semifinals vs. North Dakota (1–2)
Did not qualify
2011–12 Mark Johnson 33 5 2 WCHA 23 3 2 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Minnesota State (7–0, 4–0)
Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (1–3)
Won First Round vs. Mercyhurst (3–1)
Won Frozen Four vs. Boston College (6–2)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota (2–4)
2010–11 Mark Johnson 37 2 2 WCHA 24 2 2 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (9–3, 5–1)
Won Semifinals vs. North Dakota (3–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (5–4 OT)
Won First Round vs. Minnesota-Duluth (2–1)
Won Frozen Four vs. Boston College (3–2)
Won Championship vs. Boston University (4–1)
2009–10 Tracey DeKeyser* 18 15 3 WCHA 15 12 1 4th WCHA Lost Quarterfinals vs. Ohio State (2–3 OT, 3–4 OT) Did not qualify
2008–09 Mark Johnson 34 2 5 WCHA 21 2 5 2nd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Ohio State (7–0, 4–1)
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (3–1)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (5–3)
Won First Round vs. Dartmouth (7–0)
Won Frozen Four vs. Minnesota-Duluth (5–1)
Won Championship vs. Mercyhurst (5–0)
2007–08 Mark Johnson 29 9 3 WCHA 20 5 3 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinalsvs. Minnesota State (4–2, 5–0)
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota (4–3)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota-Duluth (4–5 OT)
Won First Round vs. Minnesota (3–2 OT)
Won Frozen Four vs. Harvard (4–1)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota-Duluth (0–4)
2006–07 Mark Johnson 36 1 4 WCHA 23 1 4 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. North Dakota (4–0, 3–0)
Won Semifinals vs. Ohio State (4–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (3–1)
Won First Round vs. Harvard (1–0 4OT)
Won Frozen Four vs. St. Lawrence (4–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota-Duluth (4–1)
2005–06 Mark Johnson 36 4 1 WCHA 24 3 1 1st WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. North Dakota (4–1, 6–0)
Won Semifinals vs. St. Cloud State (9–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (4–1)
Won First Round vs. Mercyhurst (2–1 2OT)
Won Frozen Four vs. St. Lawrence (1–0)
Won Championship vs. Minnesota (3–0)
2004–05 Mark Johnson 28 9 1 WCHA 20 7 1 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. St. Cloud State (3–1)
Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (3–2 OT)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota (2–3 OT)
Lost First Round vs. Dartmouth (3–4)
2003–04 Mark Johnson 25 6 3 WCHA 18 5 1 2nd WCHA Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (1–3) Did not qualify
2002–03 Mark Johnson 22 8 5 WCHA 14 6 4 3rd WCHA Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota (1–3) Did not qualify
2001–02 Trina Bourget 22 11 2 WCHA 17 6 1 3rd WCHA Won Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (4–1)
Lost Championship vs. Minnesota (2–3)
Did not qualify
2000–01 Trina Bourget 21 9 5 WCHA 13 6 5 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Bemidji State (5–2)
Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota-Duluth (5–6)
Did not qualify
1999-00 Julie Sasner 19 14 2 WCHA 15 8 1 3rd WCHA Won Quarterfinals vs. Bemidji State (9–2)
Lost Semifinals vs. Minnesota (0–5)
Did not qualify

[11]

* Johnson took a one-year leave to coach the 2010 US Women's Olympic team.


Frozen Four[edit]

Wisconsin appeared in the Frozen Four championship in the following years:

Year Champion Score Runner-up City Arena
2006 Wisconsin 3–0 Minnesota Minneapolis, MN Mariucci Arena
2007 Wisconsin 4–1 Minnesota-Duluth Lake Placid, NY Herb Brooks Arena
2008 Minnesota-Duluth 4–0 Wisconsin Duluth, MN DECC
2009 Wisconsin 5–0 Mercyhurst Boston, MA Agganis Arena
2011 Wisconsin 4–1 Boston Erie, PA Tullio Arena
2012 Minnesota 4–2 Wisconsin Duluth, MN DECC
2017 Clarkson 3–0 Wisconsin St. Charles, MO Family Arena
2019 Wisconsin 2–0 Minnesota Hamden, CT People's United Center
2021 Wisconsin 2–1 (OT) Northeastern Erie, PA Erie Insurance Arena

Current roster[edit]

As of August 20, 2022.[12]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height DoB Hometown Previous team
1 Quebec Jane Gervais Sophomore (RS) G 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2003-03-20 Valcourt, Quebec Stanstead College
2 New York (state) Natalie Buchbinder Graduate D 5' 8" (1.73 m) 1999-01-22 Fairport, New York Shattuck-Saint Mary's
3 Minnesota Sophie Helgeson Sophomore D 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2003-03-10 Roseau, Minnesota Roseau High School
4 New Hampshire Caroline Harvey Freshman D 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2002-10-14 Salem, New Hampshire North American Hockey Academy
6 Maryland Lacey Eden Sophomore (RS) F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2002-05-02 Annapolis, Maryland Pittsburgh Penguins Elite
7 Illinois Jesse Compher Senior F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 1999-07-01 Northbrook, Illinois Boston University
9 Saskatchewan Sophie Shirley Graduate F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 1999-06-30 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Calgary Inferno
10 Ohio Laila Edwards Freshman F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 2004-01-25 Cleveland Heights, Ohio Bishop Kearney Selects
12 Saskatchewan Grace Shirley Senior F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2001-07-20 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Saskatoon Stars
14 Minnesota Mayson Toft Junior D 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2002-03-29 Lowry, Minnesota Alexandria Area High School
16 Minnesota Claire Enright Freshman F 5' 5" (1.65 m) 2004-04-16 Farmington, Minnesota Lakeville South High School
17 North Dakota Britta Curl (A) Senior (RS) F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 2000-03-20 Bismarck, North Dakota Bismarck Blizzard
18 Quebec Marianne Picard Freshman (RS) F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2002-11-13 Repentigny, Quebec Stanstead College
20 Minnesota Vivian Jungels Freshman D 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2003-10-08 Edina, Minnesota Edina High School
21 Illinois Nicole LaMantia (A) Graduate D 5' 4" (1.63 m) 1999-10-27 Wayne, Illinois Chicago Mission
23 Alberta Sarah Wozniewicz Sophomore F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 2003-08-25 Cochrane, Alberta Edge School
24 Minnesota Katie Kotlowski Junior (RS) D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 2001-08-03 Warroad, Minnesota Warroad High School
25 Ohio Chayla Edwards Senior D 5' 9" (1.75 m) 2001-04-11 Cleveland Heights, Ohio Pittsburgh Penguins Elite
26 Massachusetts Casey O'Brien Junior F 5' 4" (1.63 m) 2001-08-27 Milton, Massachusetts Shattuck-Saint Mary's
27 Michigan Kirsten Simms Freshman F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2004-08-31 Plymouth, Michigan Little Caesars
28 Ontario Maddi Wheeler Junior F 5' 4" (1.63 m) 2002-10-10 Erinsville, Ontario Nepean Jr. Wildcats
30 New York (state) Cami Kronish Senior (RS) G 6' 0" (1.83 m) 2000-02-24 New York, New York North American Hockey Academy
32 California Chloe Baker Freshman G 5' 6" (1.68 m) 2004-07-02 Hermosa Beach, California Chicago Mission


Awards and honors[edit]

WCHA honors[edit]

WCHA All-Star teams[edit]

Year Team Player(s)
2015 All-WCHA First Team Blayre Turnbull
All-WCHA Second Team Brittany Ammerman

Annie Pankowski

All-WCHA Third Team Courtney Burke

Karley Sylvester

Ann-Renée Desbiens

WCHA All-Rookie Team Emily Clark

Annie Pankowski

2020 All-WCHA First Team Abby Roque

Badger Award[edit]

The Badger Award is a team honor known as Most Inspirational Player award.

Frozen Four All-Tournament team[edit]

Year Player Position
2011 Brooke Ammerman Reimer[15] Forward
Meghan Duggan Forward
Carolyne Prevost Forward
Alev Kelter Defense

All-America honors[edit]

  • Sarah Nurse, Second-Team All-American (2016-17)[16]
  • Annie Pankowski, Second-Team All-American (2016-17)
  • Jenny Ryan, Second-Team All-American (2016-17)
  • Abby Roque: 2020 First Team All-American
  • Grace Bowlby, 2020-21 CCM/AHCA First Team All-American[17]
  • Daryl Watts, CCM/AHCA 2020-21 First Team All-American[17]

USCHO D-1 Women's Player of the Year[edit]

HCA Awards[edit]

  • Daryl Watts, Hockey Commissioners Association Women’s Player of the Month (March 2021):[18]
  • Makenna Webster, Hockey Commissioners Association Women’s Rookie of the Month (March 2021)
  • Lacey Eden, Hockey Commissioners Association Women’s Rookie of the Month (February 2021) [19]

WCHA 20th Anniversary Team[edit]

Career records[edit]

Career Points Leaders (Top Ten All-Time Scorers)[edit]

Name Career Games Goals Assists Total points Years played
1 Hilary Knight 161 143 119 262 2007–2012
2 Brianna Decker 143 115 129 244 2009–2013
3 Meghan Duggan 159 108 130 238 2006–2011
4 Sara Bauer 152 80 138 218 2003–2007
5 Brooke Ammerman 153 98 117 215 2008–2012
6 Annie Pankowski 152 96 109 205 2014–2019
7 Meghan Hunter 132 84 93 177 2000–2004
8 Erika Lawler 163 55 119 174 2005–2009
9 Abby Roque 154 56 114 170 2016–2020
10 Kendra Antony 137 67 92 159 1999–2003

Career Goaltending Records (Top Ten - Games Played)[edit]

Name Games Years played
1 Alex (Rigsby) Cavallini 133 2010–2014
2 Ann-Renée Desbiens 122 2013–2017
3 Jackie MacMillan 121 1999–2003
4 Jessie Vetter 115 2005–2009
5 Kristen Campbell 110 2017–2020
6 Meghan Horras 68 2002–2006
7 Christine Dufour 53 2003–2007
8 Becca Ruegsegger 32 2009–2011
9 Jennifer Neary 27 1999–2002
10 Alannah McCready 26 2006–2010

Career Goaltending Records (Top Ten - Wins)[edit]

Name Wins Years played
1 Alex Rigsby 100 2010–2014
2 Ann-Renée Desbiens 99 2013–2017
3 Jessie Vetter 91 2005–2009
4 Kristen Campbell 90 2017–2020
5 Jackie MacMillan 75 1999–2003
6 Meghan Horras 48 2002–2006
7 Christine Dufour 45 2003–2007
8 Becca Ruegsegger 19 2009–2011
9 Alannah McCready 12 2006–2010
10 Jennifer Neary 6 1999–2002

Career Goaltending Records (Top Ten - Saves)[edit]

Name Saves Years played
1 Alex Rigsby 3,126 2010–2014
2 Jackie MacMillan 2,527 1999–2003
3 Ann-Renée Desbiens 2,295 2013–2017
4 Jessie Vetter 2,175 2004–2009
5 Kristen Campbell 1,888 2017–2020
6 Meghan Horras 1,291 2002–2006
7 Christine Dufour 907 2003–2007
8 Becca Ruegsegger 611 2009–2011
9 Alannah McCready 456 2006–2010
10 Jennifer Neary 311 1999–2002

Career Goaltending Records (Top Ten - Shutouts)[edit]

Name Shutouts Years played
1 Ann-Renée Desbiens 55 2013–2017
2 Jessie Vetter 39 2005–2009
3 Alex Rigsby 30 2010–2014
4 Kristen Campbell 27 2017–2020
5 Christine Dufour 18 2003–2007
6 Meghan Horras 17 2002–2006
7 Jackie MacMillan 15 1999–2003
T8 Becca Ruegsegger 5 2009–2011
T8 Alannah McCready 5 2006–2010
9 Jennifer Neary 3 1999–2002
10 Jorie Walters 2 2012–2016

Patty Kazmaier Award Winners[edit]

  • Sara Bauer – 2007
  • Jessie Vetter – 2009
  • Meghan Duggan – 2011
  • Brianna Decker – 2012
  • Ann-Renée Desbiens – 2017[21]

Bob Allen Women's Hockey Player of the Year Winners[edit]

  • Jessie Vetter – 2009
  • Meghan Duggan – 2011
  • Hilary Knight – 2014
  • Brianna Decker – 2015[22]
  • Abby Roque - 2020[23]

Badgers in professional hockey[edit]

= CWHL All-Star = PHF All-Star = Clarkson Cup Champion = Isobel Cup Champion